The Government’s Proposed 50% Funding Cut to Music at HE Level

The Government is planning to impose a disastrous 50% funding cut to arts subjects including music at Higher Education level in England.

Known as “residual funding”, it is the money the Government gives Higher Education Institutions to top up course funding that otherwise comes from students’ tuition fees.

These cuts will cause chaos for students starting courses this autumn, and put the UK’s world leading reputation for music and the arts at risk.

There are also problems with the consultation process. On such an important issue as this why has there been such a short time for the consultation process and almost non existent communications to the education and music constituency. A  funding cut of this size warrants a full, fair and transparent consultation process with an impact analysis of the likely effects these cuts will have on music in the UK.

APPJAG has written to the Rt Hon Gavin Williamson MP, the Secretary of State for Education and to  Nicola Dandridge CBE the CEO of the Office for Students.

Both letters can be read here:

Letter from APPJAG to Rt Hon Gavin Williamson Secretary of State for Education 6th May 2021

Letter from APPJAG to the Office For Students 6th May 2021

Nominations for the Parliamentary Awards 2021 are now open

Press Release

appg-port-square-page-001Voting is now open for the 2021 Parliamentary Jazz Awards, which this year will take place online. Entries are open to anyone with the final deadline set for midnight on Tuesday 14th May 2021. The Parliamentary Awards celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom.

“These awards are a great opportunity to celebrate the talents and energies of the great musicians, educators, promoters, record labels, jazz organisations, blogs, jazz magazines and journalists who keep jazz flourishing, in spite of the challenges they faced in 2020”.  John Spellar MP, Lord Mann, Co-chairs of APPJAG, Alison Thewless MP and Chi Onwurah MP, Vice Chairs.

To vote please go to: https://www.smartsurvey.co.uk/s/parliamentaryjazzawards2021/

Please note the criteria for the different categories:

Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2020 by a UK band or musicians).  Parliamentary Awards Shield
Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK).
Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2020).
Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK).
Jazz Media Award (including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books).
Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters).
Jazz Ensemble of the Year (UK-based group who impressed in 2020).
Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2020).
Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2020).

Lockdown Innovation Award.

The awards are organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), co-chaired by John Spellar MP and Lord Mann.

Notes to the Editor

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) currently has over 116 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament. The Group’s officers as at the Annual General Meeting on 22nd March 2021 are Co-Chairs, John Spellar MP and Lord Mann, Secretary, Sir Greg Knight MP, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Chi Onwurah MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are Lord Colwyn and Sarah Champion MP.

The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins with the assistance of Louis Flood. The contact address is: appjag1@gmail.com the web address is: https://appjag.wordpress.com/

John Spellar MP withdraws Bill after Government backs plan to protect music venues

John Spellar MP withdraws Bill after Government backs plan to protect music venues.

Earlier this year, former Government Minister and Labour MP Mr Spellar submitted proposals to Parliament – in the form of the Planning (Agent of Change) Bill – which would have required those responsible for new developments and changes of use to put measures in place to allow existing music venues to continue to operate and co-exist, such as sound-proofing – rather than placing the responsibility on the venue.

Following a determined campaign by UK Music, the Music Venue Trust, John Spellar MP and others, the Government introduced changes to planning guidance which incorporated the proposals in John Spellar’s Bill. As a result, John Spellar MP has withdrawn his Bill. Commenting, John Spellar MP said: “This is a great result for campaigners, activists, music venues and the music industry as a whole who have fought for years to make this legislation a reality and halt the decline in music venues.”

“The British music industry is one of our most unique offers as a country – and we should be doing all we can to make sure this industry thrives.”

“Having adopted the measures contained in my Bill into law, it is now vital that councils ensure these are implemented effectively – to make sure reality matches rhetoric.”

UK Music CEO Michael Dugher said: “Thanks to John Spellar’s fantastic work, music venues will now get vital protection from developers.

“I have no doubt that John’s forensic knowledge of parliamentary process and campaigning zeal played a key part in getting this crucial change, which has been welcomed by the entire music industry, onto the statute book.

“Thanks to his efforts, music fans in the Black Country and across the UK should be able to continue watching their favourite acts at their favourite venues.”

UK Music
10th September 2018

Connects Music – Covid-19 Impact Study on UK Musicians’ and Music Creators’ Livelihoods

Connects Music – Covid-19 Impact Study on UK Musicians’ and Music Creators’ Livelihoods

This report reveals the impact over the last nine months of Covid-19 on UK musicians and music creators who are at the heart of the UK’s £5.8 billion music industry (UK Music defines music creators as musicians, composers, songwriters, lyricists, singers, producers and engineers).

ConnectsMusic, a well-established music networking body, reached out to its community of over 5,000 members plus its extended network in a sample survey. The survey sought data on the following aspects of musicians’/music creators’ activities:

● Earnings from live performance
● Numbers of performances
● Income from recording session work
● Royalties and composition
● Online performance work and royalties from streaming
● Education work
● Well-being
● Government support

The headline survey findings include the following:

● Since the March 2020 lockdown musicians’ earnings from live performance
have slumped by over 90%
● 92% of those surveyed have little or no live performances lined up in 2021
● 83% of the musicians and music creators surveyed reported a significant
reduction in earnings from recording.
● 84% of musicians and music creators surveyed have lost teaching work
● 40% of the musicians and music creators surveyed are considering quitting
the music industry.

Whilst the public generally think of musicians in terms of live performance, musicians also earn money from recording, broadcast and publishing royalties, composition and teaching. The ConnectsMusic survey shows that musicians and music creators have lost significant portions of income from each of these.

The closure of public entertainment facilities has meant that the public has switched to online entertainment instead. The ConnectsMusic survey shows that there has been an increase in music streaming, but there has not been a corresponding increase in royalty earnings to musicians and music creators.

The Surveys detailed findings are here: https://connectsmusic.com/covid-impact-survey-results/

APPJAG members briefing paper for the debate on Covid-19 and the Cultural and Entertainment Sectors on Tuesday 2 March

All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group briefing paper for the debate on Covid-19 and the Cultural and Entertainment Sectors on Tuesday 2 March 2021.

“Everyone’s running on empty, but the will and passion to survive are still there; the means to achieve it has to be the goal. This cannot be done without a national strategy, fairly framed and guided by experienced professionals whose advice would be ignored with dire and irretrievable consequences”
Stuart Johnson, music programme assistant at Zeffirelli’s Ambleside

1 Where are we now?

Covid-19 has had a devastating effect on the cultural economy. In 2019 arts and culture contributed £10.47 billion to the UK economy of which the UK music industry contributed £5.8 billion The Night Time Industries Association estimate that the night time economy (nightclubs, pubs, bars, and live music venues) contributes £66 billion to the UK economy…………………………..

Read briefing paper here: APPJAG members briefing paper for the debate on Covid-19 and the Cultural and Entertainment Sectors on Tuesday 2 March 2021.

All Party Parliamentary Group for the Night Time Economy – Report On Impact Of Covid-19 On UK Nightlife

All Party Parliamentary Group for the Night Time Economy

Report On Impact Of Covid-19 On UK Nightlife

Read the report Here 

40 MPs tell Chancellor and PM, act now or see ‘extinction’ of UK Nightlife

The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for the Night Time Economy, a cross-party group of more than 40 MPs, has today published the findings of its recent inquiry into the impact of Covid which warns that the sector is at risk of ‘extinction’ unless the  Government takes urgent action. The MPs urge the Prime Minister and Chancellor to bring forward a sector-specific grant package and a detailed roadmap for reopening the sector to avoid ‘irreversible losses’ that would create ‘ghost towns’ across country and hinder the wider economic recovery.

The report, entitled ‘Covid-19 and UK Nightlife’, looked at the impact of the pandemic and Government support for businesses in the night time economy, including night clubs, bars, pubs, live music venues, festivals, and supply chain businesses. It involved a survey which received over 20,000 responses from consumers, employers, employees, and freelancers in the sector.Key findings of the survey included:

  1.  85 per cent of people working in the night time economy are considering leaving the industry
  2. 78 per cent of all employees in the sector had at some point been on furlough
  3. Businesses in the night time economy had on average made 37 per cent of their total workforce redundant
  4. In the second half of 2020, businesses in the night time economy traded at an average of 28 per cent of their annualised pre-Covid turnover
  5. Only 36% self-employed nightlife workers have been able to claim the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS).In addition, the report includes numerous detailed personal testimonies of those in the sector describing how the pandemic has affected them.

Outside of periods of forced closure, night time economy businesses have seen numerous and changing restrictions on their ability to trade, including curfews, social distancing measures like the ‘rule of six’, the loss of vertical drinking, and requirements for a ‘substantial meal’ with alcohol. Businesses have faced significant costs and investments in adapting to new conditions, and many, including a majority of nightclubs, have been unable to trade at all.

The inquiry examined written submissions from hundreds of businesses and local authorities, including the Greater London Authority and Greater Manchester Combined Authority, key trade bodies UK Hospitality and UK Music as well as the Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport (DCMS).

The joint DCMS-BEIS submission recognised the importance of nightlife to the economy as a whole, noting that after the 2008 financial crisis the sector “helped drive the UK’s recovery more generally.” Despite this, the inquiry found that economic support for the night time economy had been “insufficient”, containing significant gaps.

Jeff Smith MP, Chair of the APPG and a former self-employed DJ, warned that the prospect of many night time economy businesses going bust would leave town and city centres across the country looking like ‘ghost towns’, noting the important role these spaces play in local economies and communities.
He commented:

“Our world-leading night clubs, pubs, bars, and live music venues are cornerstones of our communities. They drive so much economic activity both locally and nationally, and bring hope, joy and entertainment to millions across the UK. Our findings today reveal this industry is on its knees, in desperate need of additional support from the Government and a concrete plan for reopening. Without these interventions, many of these viable businesses will go under, leaving city and town centres resembling ghost towns. If the Government is serious about its ‘levelling up’ agenda it must act now to save this sector and avoid untold damage to the social fabric of this country.”

Some of the key recommendations for Government included in the report were:

  1. Extending the furlough scheme until businesses can operate without restrictions, and extending VAT and business rates relief through 2021
  2. Producing a roadmap for reopening late night venues based on the vaccination programme and mass testing
  3. Expanding eligibility for Government Grant Schemes and proving a sector-specific support package
  4. Providing a Government-backed insurance schemes and solutions to spiralling commercial rent arrears
  5. Introducing a Treasury-backed scheme to boost demand once restrictions are eased
  6. Appointing a UK Government Night Time Economy advisor

Michael Kill, CEO of the Night Time Industries Association, commented:

“We are pleased to support the APPG for the Night Time Economy when it became clear our industry’s needs weren’t being heard by policy makers. But it gives me no pleasure today to announce the findings of this report, which confirm the devastating impact that the pandemic has had on UK nightlife.
“Every day I speak with the dedicated people that make up this industry – from artists to engineers, bar staff to security, and production to promoters – they have shown great resilience in the face of adversity.

“But resilience only gets you so far without the required support. We need more assistance and a detailed plan for reopening now. Otherwise, much of what defines a night out in the UK will be lost forever.”

Arts Council England funding of National Portfolio Organisations (NPO) for jazz 2014/2022

Arts Council England funding of National Portfolio Organisations (NPO) for jazz 2014/2022

Set below in Table 1 is the funding of the National Portfolio Organisations for 2014 to 2022. Please note only those organisations are included whose activity is a give or a take a percent, 100% jazz activity. They are the core jazz National Portfolio Organisations. Whilst the Turner Sims and other organisations such as the Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival and Bristol Music Trust do an invaluable job, jazz is merely a portion of their regular programming and not their core activity. As Table 1 shows the increase in Grant in Aid for core jazz organisations is 2.02% on average. Two NPO’s received increases of 36.5% (Jazz Re:freshed) and 66.2% (Manchester Jazz Festival.

The National Youth Jazz Collective had a “technical reduction” – National Youth Jazz Collective is a National Youth Music Organisation (NYMOs). For 2015-2018, NYMOs were jointly funded by Department of Education and Arts Council England. For 2018-2022, NYMOs will receive their Arts Council England allocation as National Portfolio funding. NYMOs will receive their Department for Education funding via a restricted separate grant.

In 2017/18 only 30.2% of the funds went to Jazz NPOs outside of London. Jazz NPO’s Organisations based in London received 69.8% of the total funding of £1.678 million.

In 2018/19 there was a slight increase as 38.4% of the funds went to Jazz NPO’s outside of London. Jazz NPO’s Organisations based in London received 61.6% of the total funding of £1,712,870.

In 2018/19, Opera received a total of £57.1 million of which 32.5% will be spent outside of London. Classical music will receive £19 million of which 55% is allocated to the English regions. For the avoidance of doubt 3.4 million people attend classical music concerts, 2.1 million people attend jazz concerts and 1.7 million people attend opera.

To table for ACE funding of Jazz NPOs please click on the table below

Arts-Council-England-funding-of-National-Portfolio-Organisations-for-2014-to-2022

Table 1. Source: Arts Council England

Notes to Table 1
1 Jazz Services funds for 2014/15 are net of the National Youth Jazz Orchestra that was a NPO under the umbrella of Jazz Services.

2 Jazz North in 2014/15 whilst technically not a NPO was funded as such

Chris Hodgkins
27th June 2018

Jazz musicians and volunteer promoters – falling between the cracks – the DCMS response – round three

The story so far. APPJAG wrote to the Secretary of State for Digital Culture Media and Sport on the 11th August 2020 and received a reply on the 24th September. The response failed to address any of the issues raised. APPJAG replied on the 5th October 2020. The correspondence can be seen here: Response and reply to the DCMS of the 24th September and the 5th October 2020

On the 14th December APPJAG received a response that regrettably failed to address the issues that had been raised. APPJAG responded on the 17th January 2021.

The DCMS response can be seen here:

Response from the Rt Hon Caroline Dinenage MP Minister of State for Digital and Culture of 14th December 2020

A further response from APPJAG to the DCMS can be seen here:

Letter from APPJAG to Rt Hon Caroline Dinenage MP Minister of State for Digital and Culture 17th January 2021

 

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement – How to help musicians work in the EU after BREXIT

The Trade and Cooperation Agreement – How to help musicians work in the EU 

UK music industry generated £2.9 billion in exports in 2019, a 9% increase from £2.7 billion in 2018.

Most musicians and performers rely on touring and performing in the European Union to make a living. Musicians, and other creative and cultural workers, have specific needs and it is crucial that visa and customs rules post-Brexit take this into account.

An inability to maintain these exports due to restrictions on working in the EU will seriously damage Britain’s image and reputation as well. It will also lead to an increase in unemployment and reduce the sector’s contribution to the economy.

To see the full briefing paper to MPs and Peers please go to:The Trade and Cooperation Agreement How to help musicians work in the EU

To see abbreviated version please go to: The Trade and Cooperation Agreement How to help musicians work in the EU short version

Submission to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee inquiry into the “Economics of music streaming” on behalf of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group.

APPJAG is submitting evidence to the inquiry to ensure that musicians and composers achieve equitable payment for their music and to ensure a level playing field through regulation will enable ethical business models to become the norm.

Summary

  1. The dominant organisations are the likes of Spotify, Apple Music and Amazon Music. They are effectively a mass market with millions of subscribers.
  2. The payment system used on the major streaming services is the “pro rata” model. With this system, the total revenues are divided and distributed according to the share of total streams for the given payment period.
  3. For a jazz musician to earn the average household disposable income (after taxes and benefits) of £30,800 from Spotify for the financial year ending 2020, their music would have to be streamed 10.1 million times.
  4. Both jazz and classical music are disadvantaged. On a major streaming service a 10 minute long symphony movement or a 7 minute long jazz recording is paid the same amount as a 31-second instrumental hip-hop interlude.
  5. An analysis of the total of monies accruing to record labels, performers and the collecting societies from the monthly breakdown of a French streaming company; showed the record labels taking the lion’s share of 75.7%.
  6. Playlists and curators whilst appearing to provide a service to consumers are having an insidious effect on music especially with regard to non featured musicians and bands. The impact of playlists, curators and ‘play listing’ by Spotify has pretty clearly shown that whether by design or not, the big streaming platforms are creating winners and losers while they are driving what some characterize as a “revival” of the music entertainment industry.
  7. The complexities of streaming royalty calculations and the fact that streaming has resulted in the ‘unbundling’ of albums means that musicians receive a fraction of the revenue once received from physical album sales.
  8. The underlying malaise is that digital distribution has allowed a scale of mass consumption of music hitherto unknown and in the process lowered people’s expectations of the price they should pay.
  9. There is a crucial need for UK copyright protection with teeth.
  10. With copyright protection there needs to be greater transparency amongst record labels, music publishers, streaming platforms and other licensing entities so that creators can effectively use their right to audit music companies they are signed to or who administer royalties for them. Furthermore assignment of rights to a music company should have a maximum term, after which the rights should automatically return to the creator, who could decide to extend or place their rights elsewhere.
  11. Finally there needs to be a programme that educates all types of music creators regarding their rights and the operations of the music industry.
    Currently revenues are paid out under the pro rata system. A change in the way revenues are distributed to a “user-centric payment system” – or UCPS would be far more equitable. Under this model, subscriber revenues are distributed according to what the individual user has spent their time listening to.

Please see for the full report: appjag-submission-to-the-dcms-committee-inquiry-into-the-economics-of-music-streaming-15th-november-2020

Submission to the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee inquiry into the “The future of UK music festivals” on behalf of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group

APPJAG is submitting evidence to the inquiry to ensure that UK music festivals and jazz festivals in particular are given the support and resources to enable them to survive and thrive up to and when normality is resumed.

Summary

Reference 1 – UK Music festivals generate and contribute £6 billion to the economy. Of crucial importance is music tourism contributing £4.5 billion to the economy in 2018. Jazz Festivals are an important part of the UK jazz Scene. The number of jazz festivals in the UK ranges from 91-200. Music and jazz festivals have a number of beneficial impacts that are social, political, creative and economic. The multiplier effect of festivals is such that, for example,  £1 spent at Manchester Jazz Festival will generate £6 for the local economy.

Reference 2 – Without financial support 30% of the UK festival scene will not survive into 2021. As the festival sector is a £6 billion contributor to the economy that will transform it into a £4.2 billion contributor with a corresponding impact on jobs and local economies.

Reference 3 – The Association of Independent Festivals has made a number of recommendations to the UK Government that include business support packages, VAT breaks on ticket sales for a minimum of 18 months and social distancing measures.

Reference 4 – Audiences need to be confident that they can attend a festival safely and that there are facilities or support for testing, which is achievable through rapid testing and track and trace.

Reference 5 – Detailed evidence will be provided by other organisation such as UK Music, Association of Independent Festivals and Association of Festival Organisers.

Reference 6 – More and more people are motivated by the social aspect of a live event. Another growing concern for attenders is “eco impact”. There is a growing preference for people to attend cash-free music events, digital payments could revolutionise the events industry.

Reference 7 – The Association of Independent Festivals has set up a number of initiatives to address these issues such as no single use tents, campaigns to eliminate all single use plastic by 2021, a Festival Fuel Tool – festivals organisers can now use a free online tool to check their energy performance in less than a minute and campaigns to raise awareness of legal highs.

Please see for full report: appjag-submission-to-the-dcms-committee-inquiry-into-the-future-of-uk-music-festivals

Jazz musicians and volunteer promoters – falling between the cracks – and no parachute – the DCMS response

APPJAG wrote to the Secretary of State for Digital Culture Media and Sport on the 11th August and received a reply on the 24th September. The response failed to address a single issue raised by APPJAG.

The DCMS response can be seen here:

The response from APPJAG can be seen here:

Jazz musicians and volunteer promoters – falling between the cracks

Whilst this paper deals with jazz musicians and volunteer promoters it would be equally applicable to many genres from folk to brass bands and from indie music to rap.

This paper reinforces the findings of the Impact of Covid-19 on DCMS Sectors: First Report by the select committee for Digital Culture Media and Sport. MPs say the response of the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport has been hampered by the Department’s fundamental misunderstanding across Government of the needs, structures and vital social contribution of sectors such as the creative industries. The Report finds the loss of performing arts institutions and cultural workers would put at risk the Government’s ‘levelling up’ agenda and reverse decades of progress in cultural provision, diversity and inclusion.

The paper highlights the problems experienced by jazz musicians and jazz promoters in terms of funding and access to funds for self-employed musicians who are falling between the cracks.

The £1.5 billion recovery funding for arts and culture is to be welcomed along with the lowering of VAT to 5% for concerts. Regrettably, there are concerns about the delivery of the fund and the criteria that have been set by the DCMS. The fund is designed to support the survival of cultural and heritage organisations that are of international or national cultural significance, or that contribute to the levelling-up agenda, and that are at risk of no longer trading viably by the end of this financial year. Swathes of individuals and volunteer organisations crucial to a healthy music seen will fall through this particular crack. Bands and musicians do not suddenly arrive at the O2 Arena there is an infrastructure that assiduously works to get them there and if that infrastructure is left to flounder through a lack of investment, the UK will lose its competitive edge, in terms of music development, music exports and “soft power”.

Who determines who is of national cultural significance? As the Arts Council is delivering the fund, there is a potential for a conflict of interests between Arts Council funded National Portfolio Organisations (NPOs) and all the many organisations who do not receive funds form Arts Council England who will all be applying to the fund. The Arts Council to its great credit has produced full reports on the expenditure of their emergency funds to date of £64.8 million invested in 9,666 people and organisations plus £33 million to 196 National Portfolio organisations. However a “snap” audit is essential of those individuals and organisations who have received funds plus the title of the emergency funding scheme that provided these funds. This audit is crucial in order to identify those people and organisations that are falling between the cracks.

There is a problem with the ministerial task forces – they are not joined up. The arts are in the hands of the DCMS, whilst pubs and restaurants are with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. Pubs and restaurants enable a great deal of music making, entertainment, maturing circuits, comedy clubs. A prima facie example is the Pizza Express restaurant chain.

There is a flaw in the Entertainments and Events Working Group comprising 49 organisations. 69% of the organisations are based in London and 31% outside of the M25. Of the 49 members only two organisations are representative of diverse communities.

It is crucially important that with a new post-Covid and Brexit landscape a national arts plan is developed that ensures that the arts and culture play a part in healing the nation and drives the export of arts and culture. To make this happen the arts requires a reformation in arts funding with an organisation that can deliver a rolling, realistic and coherent national plan for the arts, entertainment and culture where under-represented musics and art forms finally get a place in the sun.

The Government should retain the 5% VAT rate for the performing arts and entertainment for the long term to assist recovery..

APPJAG has wrote to the Secretary of State for Digital Culture Media and Sport on the 15th August and is waiting for a reply and a response.

The letter to the Secretary of State and the paper “Jazz musicians and volunteer promoters – falling between the cracks” can be downloaded here:

Letter from APPJAG to Rt Hon Oliver Dowden CBE MP 11th August 2020

Jazz Musicians and volunteer promoters – falling between the cracks

Recipients Announced For 2020 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

Recipients Announced For 2020 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The recipients of the 2020 Parliamentary Jazz Awards were announced on Tuesday 30th June at 20:00

The Parliamentary Jazz Awards are organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live. The Awards celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom.

The award categories reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene: Jazz Vocalist of the Year; Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year; Jazz Album of the Year; Jazz Ensemble of the Year; Jazz Newcomer of the Year; Jazz Venue of the Year; Jazz Media Award; Jazz Education Award; and the Services to Jazz Award.

John Spellar MP, Co-Chair of APPJAG, said: These Awards demonstrate the wealth of talent and commitment that exists in the British jazz scene. Now in its 15th year, the Parliamentary Jazz Awards honour the best of British jazz. MPs and Peers in the All Party Group are delighted to work with, and we are extremely grateful to PizzaExpress Live for supporting the event.”

Chi Onwurah MP, Deputy Chair of APPJAG: “This has been another really strong year for the Parliamentary Jazz Awards in terms of talent and nominations. The well deserved recipients are a veritable who’s who of names that have made a real impact on the music and helped make the UK one of the world’s leading jazz territories”.

The full list of recipients is as follows:

Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Cherise Adams-Burnett

On the cusp of releasing her own music, Cherise Adams-Burnett is quickly becoming recognised as a fiercely talented vocalist and musician.

Since graduating from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music in late 2017, Cherise has performed at many of the UK’s most prestigious venues and festivals, ranging from the BBC Proms at The Royal Albert Hall to the Kennedy Centre in Washington D.C, along with Festival performances including the UK’s Love Supreme.

Owing much of her earlier development to the highly-regarded educational group Tomorrow’s Warriors, nowadays she is glad to be involved in developing younger musicians through the same program as a both tutor and workshop leader.

https://www.cherisemusic.com

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year

Sarah Tandy

Sarah Tandy is a unique voice within the new UK jazz generation. Coming from a background which encompassed vintage jazz LPs, classical music and Coleridge poetry, her music has been shaped by London’s thriving and diverse live music scene, where jazz is the shared language in an ever-shifting musical landscape. She has swiftly risen to become one of the most in-demand players of her generation, with stints on keys for Jazz Jamaica, Nu Civilisation Orchestra, Maisha, Where Pathways Meet, Camilla George, Nubya Garcia, Nerija, Daniel Casimir, Binker Golding, Clark Tracey and many more. She is also a member of Ronnie Scott’s house band, the W3 Collective. Festival Appearances include Love Supreme Festival, Berlin Jazz Festival and two performances with her trio at the Ronnie Scott’s International Piano Trio Festival supporting Robert Glasper. In an earlier incarnation, she has also appeared as a classical soloist with the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

https://www.sarahtandy.com

Jazz Album of the Year

‘Finding Home’ – Kate Williams Four Plus Three meets Georgia Mancio

Jazz pianist/composer Kate Williams was born in London into a musical family (her father is the guitarist John Williams, her mother a classical pianist). A recipient of the John Dankworth Award For Talent Deserving Wider Recognition, she has gained a distinctive reputation as both a writer and performer.

Kate has released several previous CDs, each one to critical acclaim, including ‘Made Up’ (with her septet) and ‘Smoke And Mirrors’ (with tenor legend Bobby Wellins). Both were in Mojo magazine’s top ten jazz albums in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Kate is a founder member of Way Out West, a collective of jazz musicians based in West London which has been programming regular gigs for over ten years. Kate is also an experienced educator and is currently teaching on the jazz degree courses at the Guildhall School of Music And Drama, and Middlesex University.

Kate Williams’ Four Plus Three is collaboration between acclaimed jazz pianist/composer Kate Williams, vocalist Georgia Mancio, and the Guastalla string quartet. It was launched in spring 2016 with a short UK tour and support from Arts Council England. Kate continues her longstanding musical partnership with award-winning vocalist/lyricist Georgia Mancio: Finding Home: Kate Williams’ Four Plus Three meets Georgia Mancio was premiered on 6th October 2017 at the Pizza Express Jazz Club in London. The CD Finding Home was released in summer 2019, coinciding with a 14-date UK tour which received support from Arts Council England.

Award-winning jazz vocalist, lyricist and producer, Georgia Mancio, is one of Europe’s most respected, adventurous and multi-faceted new artists. Her music references classic jazz alongside her own astonishing writing and stamped with an unfailing emotional integrity.

In 2017 she released ‘Songbook’ – co-written with Grammy-winning pianist/composer Alan Broadbent – to universal acclaim and a sold out debut at Ronnie Scott’s. Other credits include Bobby McFerrin, Ian Shaw, Liane Carroll, Gwilym Simcock, Pat Metheny (lyric approval), and the renowned ReVoice! Festival and new series Hang, Kate Williams and multiple nominations in the Parliamentary, British Jazz and Urban Music Awards.

http://www.kate-williams-quartet.com

www.georgiamancio.com

Jazz Ensemble of the Year

Nikki Iles Big Band

Award winning Nikki Iles has been at the forefront of British jazz for over three decades, playing and recording with Anthony Braxton, Vince Mendoza, Mike Gibbs, Kenny Wheeler, Art Farmer, Julian Arguelles, Stan Sulzmann, Norma Winstone, Dave Holland, Tony Coe and Rufus Reid. Her legendary warmth and generosity as a teacher – backed up by her considerable profile as a player and composer – have inspired generations of jazz musicians. She is currently Professor of Jazz Piano at the Guildhall and the Royal Academy of Music, but she is much in demand further afield. Nikki is also a tireless promoter of younger talent, teaching regularly in Bedford schools as well as being part of the core team on regional summer courses – specifically NYJO and the NYJC.  Her publishing profile – through Oxford University Press – now brings all sorts of musicians into jazz from other genres.

Nikki’s 20 piece Jazz Orchestra marks a new chapter in a long and distinguished career in British Jazz, gathering together commissions from over the years, new orchestrations of her own small band tunes and new compositions, all played by the remarkable band she has assembled. The depth and range of the exhilarating writing and arranging suggest it will be less like a debut, but more like seasoned hand and a distinctive voice, with the music bought to vivid life by a top drawer band, featuring some of the UK’s finest musicians – often bandleaders in their own right – including Gareth Lockrane, Tori Freestone, Mike Walker, Julian Siegel, Henry Lowther, Nick Smart and Karen Sharp.

www.nikkiiles.co.uk

Jazz Newcomer of the Year

Luca Manning

Luca Manning is young jazz vocalist and composer from Glasgow. Luca has had the opportunity to perform at various festivals across the UK – opening for the likes of Georgie Fame and Becca Stevens. His ability as not just a consummate vocalist, but also as a gifted improviser, continues to enthral audiences and shows maturity well beyond his years. In 2018, Luca was voted ‘Rising Star’ at the Scottish Jazz Awards and was also nominated in the ‘Best Vocalist’ category.

Now resident in London, Luca is fast making a name for himself. He is in his third year at the Guildhall School of Music on the Bmus Jazz degree and already has played major London venues such as Pizza Express Jazz Club and Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club in Soho leading his own ensembles. He has also become a vocal chair holder with the National Youth Jazz Orchestra since January 2018, a member of the London Vocal Project (2018), and in December 2017, was invited by Liane Carroll to guest on her sold-out Christmas show at Ronnie Scott’s. Luca has just released ‘A Sleepin’ Bee’ with Threebop, a vocal group where Luca appears alongside Ella Hohnen-Ford and Rosina Bullen.

https://www.lucamanningmusic.com

Jazz Venue of the Year

PizzaExpress Jazz Club

PizzaExpress Founder Peter Boizot was a jazz lover and constantly sought ways to include music in his restaurants, whether at PizzaExpress branches from the late 1960s, and at his other ventures Pizza on the Park and Kettner’s from the 1970s. The flagship venue at 10 Dean Street, London has hosted internationally acclaimed jazz artists since its first ticketed show, Bud Freeman, on 26th May 1976, including Clark Terry, Benny Carter, Van Morrison, Carla Bley, Monty Alexander, Amy Winehouse, and thousands more. The jazz club presented the UK debuts of Gregory Porter, Diana Krall, Brad Mehldau, e.s.t., Norah Jones, among many others. The 2019 programme included appearances by John Scofield, Benny Golson, Houston Person, Joel Ross, Jakob Bro, David Benoit, Joachim Kuhn, Eddie Henderson, as well as young and up-and-coming artists, album launches, festivals like Sounds of Denmark, the Steinway 2-piano Festival, London Latin Jazz Fest, and more than 30 shows in the EFG London Jazz Festival. PizzaExpress Live also run The Pheasantry in Chelsea, and venues in Holborn, Birmingham and Maidstone, programming almost 2000 shows across the five venues.

www.pizzaexpresslive.com

Jazz Media Award

Corey Mwamba “Freeness” BBC Radio 3

Corey Mwamba is the presenter of Freeness on  BBC Radio 3. Born and based in Derby, Dr Corey Mwamba’s commitment to jazz and improvised music in Britain and Ireland drives all aspects of his work, whether through making, presenting, promoting, or researching music.

Corey predominantly plays vibraphone and  dulcimer. He is recognised as a highly creative improviser and composer working across a wide range of jazz and contemporary music. Mwamba’s distinctive approach and tone is instantly recognisable in any context: a potent blend of pure sound, highly melodic phrases and ethereal textures; barely whispered chords and ear-piercing robotic screams.

Corey won a PRSF/Jerwood Foundation Take Five artist development award in 2007; was short-listed for the Innovation category in the BBC Jazz Awards in 2008; and received nominations for “Rising Star on Vibraphone” in the DownBeat Annual Critics’ Polls.

https://www.coreymwamba.co.uk/

Reduced Listening are the producers of BBC Radio 3’s “Freeness”. They are an audio company making radio, podcasts, drama and documentaries. They work with the BBC and arts institutions, alongside cutting edge musicians, artists, and with people who have a story to tell.

https://www.reducedlistening.co.uk/

Jazz Education Award

Jon Eno BEM

Jon Eno was awarded a British Empire Medal (BEM) in the Queen’s Birthday Honours list for his services to jazz music education. Jon is recognised in the world of jazz education as an ambassador for youth music. He set up the East Midlands Youth Jazz Orchestra in September 2002, together with Hot House Music Schools Ltd.

Students from beginner level to some of the best in the country travel great distances to work with the Hot House team and be part of their ensembles.

Performance is encouraged wherever and whenever, from formal black tie concerts, to outdoor bandstands, to small group jazz and solo work. He is a trusted mentor figure to whom many students have turned to for support and many of his students have gained entry to the top music colleges and gone on to work as professionals in the music industry.

Jonathan also established a gospel choir and a saxophone group for adults with some musical background or none at all, that provides the same inspirational opportunities as the youth sections.

He regularly arranges fund-raising events for the Teenage Cancer Trust and Marie Curie.

https://hhmusic.co.uk/

Services to Jazz Award

Blow The Fuse

Blow the Fuse was formed in 1989 by musicians and composers Deirdre Cartwright and Alison Rayner who were members of the internationally acclaimed jazz group The Guest Stars. They’ve played a crucial role in raising awareness about women jazz musicians and importantly giving them support, a space and opportunity to perform in times which have been very challenging.

They have been very much part of the new resurgence of jazz musicians, which contain many talented young women. Beginning in 2012, Blow the Fuses’ Tomorrow the Moon seasons one small step for women’ have featured groups led by composers Laura Jurd, Yazz Ahmed, Laura Cole, Dee Byrne, Sophie Tetteh, Lauren Kinsella, Roz Harding, Nikki Iles, Shama Rahman, Daphna Sadeh, Alexandra Ridout, Chelsea Carmichael, Camilla George and Nubya Garcia.

They’ve have managed many UK jazz tours with new musical works, innovative collaborations and educational projects and they run the Blow the Fuse record label.

http://www.blowthefuse.com

Special APPJAG Award

Jazzwise

Jazzwise magazine was launched in April 1997. It was initially funded by jazz educator Charles Alexander and featured a core group of writers including Jon Newey, who as editorial director relaunched Jazzwise in 2000 aiming to challenge the top American jazz titles for the best jazz writing and design.

In 2019 year Jazzwise celebrated its 20th anniversary, and it is the UK’s biggest selling jazz magazine in both print and digital editions and Europe’s leading English language jazz magazine. It has assembled a team of the UK’s most authoritative jazz writers, including Stuart Nicholson, John Fordham, Peter Vacher, Kevin Le Gendre, Brian Priestley and Val Wilmer, and co-founded the young jazz writer’s initiative, The Write Stuff, with Serious, designed to help new creative music writing.

Jazzwise is as deeply committed in encouraging the next generation of jazz musicians as it is about keeping the music’s colossal legacy alive and highly significant in a constantly changing musical landscape.

Jazzwise was purchased by independent publishers, the Mark Allen Group, in 2013 and formed the cornerstone of a now growing music division. Jon Newey became editor in chief and director in 2015 and promoted Mike Flynn to editor. Mike joined Jazzwise in 2006.

https://www.jazzwise.com/

-Ends-

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins

Tel: 0208 840 4643

Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

Notes to editors

The Parliamentary Awards celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom. The awards have been running since 2005.

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) currently has over 116 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament. The Group’s officers as at the inaugural meeting on 26th February are  Co-Chairs, John Spellar  MP and Lord Mann, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Chi Onwurah MP. Secretary, Sir Greg Knight MP and the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Colwyn, Baroness Howe and Baroness Healy.

The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins with the assistance of Will Riley-Smith and Louis Flood. The contact address is: appjag1@gmail.com the web address is: https://appjag.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group urge Arts Council England to reinstate National Lottery Projects Grants

Press Release

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group urge Arts Council England to reinstate National Lottery Projects Grants

When Arts Council England announced its £160 million emergency rescue package to deal with the coronavirus crisis in March 2020, arts organisations and individuals alike were rightly delighted by such a swift and positive response.

However, an important creative cause is in danger of falling through the cracks. Jazz music, an increasingly dynamic cultural force, and a renowned and invaluable stimulus to many kinds of musicmaking beyond its own borders, has in recent years been significantly dependent on the National Lottery Projects Grants Scheme for the planning of tours and creative projects. The scheme has now been suspended to release funding for the emergency measures – but no provision for its jazz commitments has been suggested in Arts Council England’s responses to queries.

The All-Party Parliamentary Appreciation Group (APPJAG), the influential jazz enthusiasts’ lobby group of MPs and Peers, is now urging Arts Council England to restore the National Lottery Projects Grants Scheme at the earliest opportunity. Individuals and bands seeking to organise tours 12 months or longer ahead cannot wait for the present crisis to be resolved and need to begin approaching promoters and venues now.

On March 28, APPJAG co-chairs John Spellar MP and Lord Mann, and deputy chair Chi Onwurah MP wrote to Darren Henley, Chief Executive Officer of Arts Council England, to raise these concerns. Following an exchange of correspondence on the subject, Darren Henley’s closing response on April 20 observed that protecting the infrastructure of venues used by performing artists required the Arts Council’s full capacity at present, and that although future planning would be difficult for some time, ‘our view is that wider and much greater uncertainties remain, such as what government restrictions may be in operation in the future, and the economic consequences of the intervening period on culture’s infrastructure.’

APPJAG is of the opinion that this response is particularly unhelpful in the jazz context, and will continue to urge Arts Council England to expedite the restoration of the National Lottery Project Grants Scheme with urgency, if ACE is not to make worse an already bad situation for jazz music in the culture-funding pecking-order. It would be ironic if bands and musicians whose current live work has been cancelled, should  also find themselves with no work next year – hopefully in post-Covid-19 conditions – due to the withholding of a relatively modest investment that would enable them to set up their 2021 bookings now.

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins
Tel: 0208 840 4643
Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

Notes to editors

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) currently has over 116 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament. The Group’s officers as at the inaugural meeting on 26th February are  Co-Chairs, John Spellar  MP and Lord Mann, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Chi Onwurah MP, the Secretary, Sir Greg Knight MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Colwyn, Baroness Howe and Baroness Healy. APPJAG run the Parliamentary Jazz Awards that celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom. The awards have been running since 2005.

The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins with the assistance of Will Riley-Smith and Louis Flood. The contact address is: appjag1@gmail.com the web address is: https://appjag.wordpress.com/

All Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2020 – Nominations Announced

All Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2020

Nominations Announced

The nominations have today been announced for the 2020 Parliamentary Jazz Awards.The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live. The recipients of the 2020 Parliamentary Jazz Awards, will be announced Tuesday 30th June 2020. The Parliamentary Awards celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom.

The award categories reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene: Jazz Vocalist of the Year; Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year; Jazz Album of the Year; Jazz Ensemble of the Year; Jazz Newcomer of the Year; Jazz Venue of the Year; Jazz Media Award; Jazz Education Award; and the Services to Jazz Award.

Following the online public vote for the Awards, the shortlist was then voted upon by a selection panel, who represent a broad cross-section of backgrounds united in their passion and knowledge of jazz. The winners, chosen by judging members of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), will be announced at  on Tuesday 30th June 2020.

John Spellar MP, Co-Chair of APPJAG, said: These shortlists demonstrate the wealth of talent and commitment that exists in the British jazz scene. Now in its 15th year, the Parliamentary Jazz Awards honours the best of British jazz. MPs and Peers in the All Party Group are delighted work with and we are extremely grateful to PizzaExpress Live for supporting the event.”

The full list of nominees is as follows:

Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Georgia Mancio

Cherise Adams-Burnett

Lianne Carroll

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year

Sarah Tandy

Rob Luft

Liam Noble

Nubya Garcia

Jazz Album of the Year

Seed Ensemble ‘Driftglass’

Yazz Ahmed ‘Polyhymnia’

‘Finding Home’ – Kate Williams Four Plus Three meets Georgia Mancio

Jazz Ensemble of the Year

Byron Wallen’s ‘Four Corners’

Seed Ensemble

Dave/O’Higgins/Rob Luft Quartet

Nikki Iles Big Band

Jazz Newcomer of the Year

Luca Manning

Rosina Bullen

Alexandra Ridout

Bonsai

Jazz Venue of the Year

Colchester Arts Centre Jazz Club

PizzaExpress Jazz Club

606 Club

Jazz Media Award

Jazzwise Magazine

Corey Mwamba “Freeness”

London Jazz News

Jazz Views

Jazz Education Award

UK Summer School

Jon Eno

Nick Smart

Services to Jazz Award

Steve Rubie

Blow The Fuse

Mike Westbrook

-Ends-

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins

Tel: 0208 840 4643

Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

Notes to editors

The Parliamentary Awards celebrate and recognise the vibrancy, diversity, talent and breadth of the jazz scene throughout the United Kingdom. The awards have been running since 2005.

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) currently has over 116 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament. The Group’s officers as at the inaugural meeting on 26th February are  Co-Chairs, John Spellar  MP and Lord Mann, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Chi Onwurah MP. Secretary, Sir Greg Knight MP and the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Colwyn, Baroness Howe and Baroness Healy.

The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins with the assistance of Will Riley-Smith and Louis Flood. The contact address is: appjag1@gmail.com the web address is: https://appjag.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

Recipients Announced for the Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2019

RECIPIENTS ANNOUNCED FOR 2019 PARLIAMENTARY JAZZ AWARDS

The recipients of the 2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards were announced last night on Tuesday 3rd December. The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), were presented at the PizzaExpress Live in Holborn.

Featuring a broad array of jazz talent from within the industry, the awards are sponsored by PizzaExpress Live. During the ceremony, award presenters comprised of British politicians and home-grown UK jazz talent including Co-Chairs of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group, Kelvin Hopkins and Lord Colwyn, Jon Newey, Editor in Chief of Jazzwise, Deirdre Cartwright, Danielle White, Raestar Promotions, Steve Crocker – Chair of Jazz Leeds and  Northern Jazz Promoters, (NORVOL), Simon Cooke, Managing Director of Ronnie Scott’s, Gary Crosby OBE,Tina May, Kevin LeGendre and Baroness Coussins.

Compére for the evening was Ross Dines of PizzaExpress Live, “This has been a really strong year for the Parliamentary Jazz Awards in terms of talent and nominations. The well deserved recipients are a veritable who’s who of names that have made a real impact on the music and helped make the UK one of the world’s leading jazz territories”.  A big hand to the Parliamentary Band on the evening; Max Brittain, Alison Rayner, Henry Lowther, Diane McLoughlin and Cheryl Alleyne.

The full list of recipients is as follows:

Jazz Vocalist of the Year: Zoe Gilby

Zoe Gilby is a vocalist and songwriter, making a stunning impression on the music scene today.

Her compelling original compositions are written with double bassist husband Andy Champion. Her music reaches covers a wide range of more contemporary material from Pink Floyd to Kate Bush, with influences from Sheila Jordan and Joni Mitchell.

Touring the UK and internationally, she continues to perform at prominent jazz festivals and venues

showcasing her original material; Koktebel International Jazz Festival, at Kiev and Odessa, Changsa International Jazz and Blues Festival, China. Pakkasukko Jazz Festival, Finland. Jazz Au Chellah Rabat, Morocco. Jazz in July, Crete to name a few

Sage Gateshead invited Zoe to be the featured soprano soloist for the spiritual work of Duke Ellington’s Sacred Concert. The Zoe Gilby Quartet has been performing rural tours facilitated by National Rural Touring and her quartet was selected for Jazz North’s Northern Line Scheme, her album Twelve Stories” was released to critical acclaim.

http://www.zoegilby.co.uk/music/

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year: Josephine Davies

Josephine Davies is a solo artist at the forefront of the UK contemporary music scene, pushing the boundaries of jazz with her current main artistic project Satori – a sax/bass/drums trio with an emphasis on extended and collaborative improvisation. It is a project that combines her seeking of freedom of expression with her interest in Japanese philosophy and lifestyle.

Originally from the Shetland Islands and now based in London, UK, Josephine’s writing and playing continues to be infused with a Nordic quality, notably in her use of traditional folk music elements, and her haunting tone reminiscent of the late great tenorist Bobby Wellins.

As a saxophonist she is known for her melodic focus, versatility and unique style which has been described as “consistently inventive” (Jazzwise Magazine), “strong and authoritative” (The JazzMann) and “gifted and imaginative” (All About Jazz).

Deeply influenced by the American composer Maria Schneider, Josephine has been resident composer and tenor player for the London Jazz Orchestra since 2011 and is now embarking on a big band project of her own.

In 2016 Josephine was privileged to be a featured soloist on veteran saxophonist and composer Pete Hurt’s jazz orchestra recording A New Start, which was released to wide acclaim and came second in the British Jazz Awards Best New Album.

https://www.josephinedavies.co.uk

Jazz Album of the Year: Fergus McCreadie – “Turas”

Winning Best Instrumentalist at the Scottish Jazz Awards aged only 20; Fergus McCreadie is one of Scotland’s most exciting artists. His compositions for his trio feature Jazz and Scottish Traditional music in equal measures, creating a fusion that is warm and appealing, yet also fresh and exciting. His debut album ‘Turas,’ was described as “Erik Satie running on Islay Malt rather than Absinthe” in a 5-star review by the Scotsman. He has played at the Oslo Jazz Festival, JazzKaar in Estonia, the Edinburgh Jazz Festival, and has been featured alongside artists such as Bob Mintzer, Mike Stern and Iain Ballamy. 

Website  http://www.fergusmccreadie.co.uk/

Jazz Ensemble of the Year: Ezra Collective

London five-piece Ezra Collective is proving themselves as a harmonious tour de force. Their sound nods respectfully to a classic jazz footprint, celebrating the originators whilst simultaneously carving a path solely their own. Ezra Collective marries the delicate technicalities of jazz musicianship with afrobeat and hip hop, tied together by a sound that’s unmistakably London. Following a joyous and stunningly cohesive show in May 2016, Boiler Room rightly labelled the group as “pioneering the new-wave of U.K. jazz”.

Ezra Collective is adding their own fresh and imaginative face to a style that continues to be “as entertaining as it is educational” (Trench). In a year that saw them sell out legendary London venue Ronnie Scott’s not once but twice, 2017 also bought with it the release of their genre-bending second EP, Juan Pablo: The Philosopher. After Ezra Collective took the EP on a successful tour across the UK and Europe winning the accolade of Best Jazz Album at Gilles Peterson’s esteemed Worldwide Awards in January 2018. The band won the 2018 Jazz FM Awards for “Best UK Jazz Act” and “Live Experience of the Year”, and in April 2019 the band released “You Can’t Steal My Joy”, which is an exuberant, defiant debut album that’s destined to cement Ezra Collective’s status as one of the UK’s most exciting groups. The Ezra Collective has just started a 12 date tour of the USA and Canada.

Ezra Collective is: Femi Koleoso – Drums, TJ Koleoso – Bass, Joe Armon Jones – Keys, Dylan Jones – Trumpet, James Mollison – Saxophone.

http://ezracollective.com

Jazz Newcomer of the Year:

Handsworth-born Xhosa Cole is an embodiment of the success of numerous community arts programmes in Birmingham. Having first played the Tenor at Andy Hamilton’s Ladywood Community Music School, he’s now among a long legacy of Birmingham Saxophonists. In October 2018, he won the BBC Young Jazz Musician competition following a critically acclaimed performance in the Final at the Queen Elizabeth Hall as part of the BFI London Jazz Festival.

Xhosa’s earliest memories of the arts are with ACE Youth Dance group. However, since playing in Holyhead School’s Jazz band with Ray Prince and Sid Peacock he decided to pursue music and joined the Jazzlines Ensemble, Birmingham Schools Symphony Orchestra, Midland youth Jazz Orchestra among others. While studying at Bishop Vesey’s Sixth Form Xhosa attended courses with the National Youth Jazz Collective and National Youth Wind Orchestra.

Xhosa continually pushes his playing while studying with teachers and mentors including Mike Williams, Jim Bashford and David Austin-Grey; Performing regularly around Birmingham; Writing for commissions by the Ideas of Noise Festival and Bobbie-Jane Gardener’s ‘For-Wards’ and teaching Birmingham’s next generation of talent alongside his former teacher Toni Grehan

https://ycat.co.uk/artist/xhosa-cole/

Jazz Venue of the Year: Watermill Jazz, Dorking

Watermill Jazz have been presenting the best of jazz in the heart of Surrey for 25 years  Its team of four volunteer activists share the planning, marketing and management of each event to make it a pleasurable and fulfilling experience for performers and audience alike.

Watermill Jazz was founded in March 1994. Weekly concerts are held every Tuesday evening except in December – an ambitious programme which they justify financially by attracting consistently good attendances and presenting a mix of established jazz artists and newcomers, some large-scale events and the occasional visiting artist from overseas

Originally based at the Watermill restaurant in Reigate Road, Watermill Jazz relocated to the Sports and Social Club of Aviva in Pixham Lane, Dorking in October 2001. It is moved to a new home at a nearby golf club in May 2016, opening with concerts by Jacqui Dankworth and Charlie Wood, then Darius Brubeck.

http://www.watermilljazz.co.uk/

Jazz Media Award: Ian Mann, The Jazz Mann

Ian Mann runs a blog called the Jazz Mann. Living in a remote area like Herefordshire means that over the years he has put in thousands of miles travelling to gigs, both home and abroad. The Brecon and Cheltenham festivals have been staples of his musical calendar since their inception, joined in recent years by the Lichfield Real Ale Jazz and Blues Festival.

Ian Mann explains: “As a fan it’s taken a lot of dedication but I’ve been lucky enough to see many of the jazz legends over the years. This music has been a voyage of discovery and I’m still learning about it

Jazz is an ever-evolving music and I think it’s great that after listening to it for all this time the emergence of exciting young musicians still gives me a thrill. I think we have some fantastically talented players in this country, right across the generations but sadly many of them are deeply undervalued.

If my work on this site helps in any way to gain greater recognition for new musicians I will be more than satisfied.

They say that in jazz you need to find your own voice. With this website I hope that I’ve found it”.

http://www.thejazzmann.com

Jazz Education Award: Nikki Iles

Nikki Iles

As a founder member of the Creative Jazz Orchestra in the early 90s, Nikki Iles came to prominence working with musicians such as Anthony Braxton, Vince Mendoza, Mark Anthony Turnage, Kenny Wheeler and Mike Gibbs. Mike subsequently booked her for one of her first recording dates with great American musicians, Steve Swallow and Bob Moses on the CD “By The Way” on AH HUM records.

For many years, Nikki served an apprenticeship in the North of England playing with the cream of British and American jazz such as Peter King, Iain Ballamy, Art Farmer, Scott Hamilton, Tim Garland and Jim Mullen. Many of these relationships were rekindled later when Nikki made the move to London in 1998. Here she joined the groups and toured and recorded with innovative musicians such as Steve Arguelles, Stan Sulzmann, Martin Speake, Mick Hutton and Tina May. Several awards followed with the BT British Jazz Award and an IAJE Award in America for services to Jazz.

Although well known as a pianist, composition still remains a major part of her musical life. There have been several nominations for the Paul Hamlyn Award and many commissions have followed. The breadth of Nikki’s artistic vision has led her to disregard the arbitrary boundaries of the jazz scene and most notably, commissions have included “In All My Holy Mountain” with poet Roger Garfitt and the New Perspectives Ensemble. A collaboration with American dancer Mimi Cichanowicz (2004) “Distance No Object” (2004) -IOU Theatre company, “A Gentle Prayer “ – London Sinfonietta , “Red Ellen” – Tim Garlands Underground Band and “Carillion – Renga (Contemporary group from the London Philharmonic Orchestra 2010). Finally Nikki was honoured to have her piece commissioned by the National Youth Jazz Orchestra featured at the 2012 Proms (broadcast Radio 3 and BBC TV).

As a player she remains much in demand. She was nominated in the piano category of the 2012 and 2013 British Jazz Awards. Recent work has taken her across the world as a member of the inspirational Julian Arguelles Octet. Also with, Joe Locke, The Kenny Wheeler Big Band, The Stan Sulzmann Quartet, Tony Coe, The Anglo/Canadian group with Martin Speake, Christine Jenson and vocal legend Norma Winstone. She has made many recordings and most recently, a trio CD “Hush“ in New York with Americans, Rufus Reid and Jeff Williams. “Mirror” with Kenny Wheeler and Norma Winstone, Stardust with Stan Sulzmann and finally her own group, The Printmakers “Westerly”. With a parallel career as a widely respected teacher, Nikki is Professor of Jazz Piano at the Royal Academy of Music and Middlesex University. She also gives master classes around the world. She has been a driving force behind the Jazz syllabus at the ABRSM and continues to publish extensively with Oxford University Press.

http://nikkiiles.co.uk/

Services to Jazz Award: Dame Cleo Laine

Born in a London suburb, Cleo showed early singing talent, which was nurtured by her Jamaican father and English mother. She auditioned successfully for a band led by musician John Dankworth, under whose banner she performed until 1958, in which year the two were married. Then began an illustrious career as a singer and actress.

In 1958 she played the lead in a new play at London’s famous Royal Court Theatre. This led to other stage performances such as the musical Valmouth in 1959, the play A Time to Laugh (with Robert Morley and Ruth Gordon) in 1962, and eventually to her show-stopping Julie in the production of Showboat at the Adelphi Theatre in 1971. During this period she had two spectacular recording successes. “You’ll Answer to Me” reached the British Top Ten. In 1964 her “Shakespeare and All that Jazz” album received widespread critical acclaim

1972 marked the start of Cleo’s international activities, with a triumphant first tour of Australia. Shortly afterwards, her career in the United States was launched with a concert at New York’s Lincoln Center, followed in 1973 by the first of many Carnegie Hall appearances. Coast-to-coast tours of the U.S. and Canada soon followed, and with them a succession of record albums and television appearances. This led, to Cleo’s first Grammy award, in recognition of the live recording of her 1983 Carnegie concert.

Other important recordings during that time were duet albums with Ray Charles (“Porgy and Bess”) and Mel Tormé, as well as Arnold Schoenberg’s “Pierrot Lunaire” which won Cleo a classical Grammy nomination.

Cleo’s relationship with the musical theatre, started in Britain, continued in the United States with starring performances in “A Little Night Music” and “The Merry Widow” (Michigan Opera). In 1985 she originated the role of Princess Puffer in the Broadway hit musical “The Mystery of Edwin Drood”, for which she received a Tony nomination, and in 1989 she received the Los Angeles critics’ acclaim for her portrayal of the Witch in Stephen Sondheim’s “Into the Woods”. Los Angeles was also the scene of a Lifetime Achievement Award to Cleo by the US recording industry (1991).

In 1979 Cleo received an OBE and in 1997 she was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire. She has also been awarded honorary doctorate degrees in the USA and UK. In 1998 the Worshipful Company of Musicians awarded her their Silver Medal for a Lifetime Contribution to British Jazz, and the British Jazz Awards have recognised her a number of times, including with a Lifetime Achievement Award in 2002. In March 2010, Laine and Dankworth’s final musical collaboration was released on CD and for download – Jazz Matters. The recording featured the Dankworth Big Band playing new compositions written by Dankworth for the couple’s performance at the 2007 Proms at the Royal Albert Hall. In 2018 Dame Cleo Laine received the PPL Lifetime Achievement Award at the Jazz FM Awards.

Special APPJAG Award: Henry Lowther

Henry Lowther was born in Leicester, England, in 1941. As a child Henry learned cornet from his father and took private violin lessons before going on to study with Manoug Parakian at the Royal Academy of Music.

In the sixties Henry was one of the first musicians on the British jazz scene to experiment with total free improvisation and also at this time began a musical relationship with Sir John Dankworth which lasted till the composer’s death in 2010. In 1967 he played on the now legendary Kenny Wheeler album, “Windmill Tilter”.

In 1969 Henry appeared at the famous Woodstock festival with the Keef Hartley band.

Over the years Henry has worked in all areas of the British jazz scene and is one of only two or three trumpet players to have played lead trumpet for both Gil Evans and George Russell. He has also worked extensively as a studio and classical musician.

Currently Henry composes and plays in the London Jazz Orchestra, leads his own band Still Waters, and is a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music.

The new album from Henry Lowther’s Still Waters, “Can’t Believe, Won’t Believe” was released in February 2018.The band was born out a long association and friendship, going back forty years, between Henry and bassist Dave Green. As a result Still Waters is now one of the most accomplished tightly ensembled and creative bands around. Although a classic quintet of two front line and rhythm, Still Waters plays radical and original music, ranging from gentle, quietly pastoral and melodic music, reflecting the band’s name, through to dynamic, free improvisation.

“Meltingly attractive solos, startling originality.” Chris Parker, Vortex
review.

henrylowther@live.co.uk

Kelvin Hopkins, APPJAG Co-Chairman, said: “The Parliamentary Jazz Awards are a great way for MPs and Peers of all political parties to show their support for British jazz by recognising and honouring the amazing musical talent we have in our country. From established stars to fresh new talent, the range and diversity of this year’s winners shows the vibrancy and creativity of British jazz. We are extremely grateful once again to PizzaEpress Live for supporting the Awards.”

APPJAG currently has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament.  The Group’s officers as at the 1st November 2019 were Co-Chairs, Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, Secretary, Baroness Coussins, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Sarah Champion MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Crathorne, John Mann MP and Sir Greg Knight MP. The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins.

Ends

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins

Tel: 0208 840 4643

Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

Notes to editors

The categories for the 2019 Awards reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene and include:

  • Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2018 by a UK band or musicians)
    •    Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Ensemble of the Year (UK-based group who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters)
    •    Jazz Media Award (including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books)
    •    Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK)
    •    Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2018)
    •    Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK).The awards have been running since 2005. APPJAG has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords, across all political parties. Its aim is to encourage a wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the industry and issues surrounding it, as well as promoting jazz as a musical form, and to raise its profile both inside and outside of Parliament.

 

 

2019 All Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards Nominations Announced

2019 All Party Parliamentary Jazz Awards Nominations Announced

The nominations have today been announced for the 2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards.The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live.

The nominees include a broad array of jazz talent from the UK jazz scene.

The award categories reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene: Jazz Vocalist of the Year; Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year; Jazz Album of the Year; Jazz Ensemble of the Year; Jazz Newcomer of the Year; Jazz Venue of the Year; Jazz Media Award; Jazz Education Award; and the Services to Jazz Award.

Following the online public vote for the Awards, the shortlist was then voted upon by a selection panel, who represent a broad cross-section of backgrounds united in their passion and knowledge of jazz. The winners, chosen by judging members of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), will be announced at the awards ceremony at PizzaExpress Live, Holborn, London on Tuesday 3rd  December 2019.

Kelvin Hopkins MP, Co-Chair of APPJAG, said: These shortlists demonstrate the wealth of talent and commitment that exists in the British jazz scene. Now in its 15th year, the Parliamentary Jazz Awards honours the best of British jazz. MPs and Peers in the All Party Group are delighted to host another ceremony at Pizza Express Live and we are extremely grateful to PizzaExpress Live for supporting the event.”

The full list of nominees is as follows:

Jazz Vocalist of the Year

Claire Martin

Georgia Mancio

Cherise Adams-Burnett

Zoe Gilby

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year

Brian Kellock

Nikki Iles

Jason Rebello

Josephine Davies

Jazz Album of the Year

Sons Of Kemet  – “Your Queen Is A Reptile”

Adrian Cox – “Profoundly Blue”

Fergus McCreadie – “Turas”

Jean Toussaint – “Brother Raymond”

Jazz Ensemble of the Year

Ezra Collective

London Vocal Project

Gareth Lockrane Big Band

Jazz Newcomer of the Year

Xhosa Cole

Fergus McCreadie

Luca Manning

Jazz Venue of the Year

Marsden Jazz Festival

Bebop Club, Bristol

Watermill Jazz Club, Dorking

Verdict Jazz Club, Brighton

Jazz Media Award

Jazzwise Magazine

Kevin Le Gendre

Ian Mann – Jazzmann

Jazz Education Award

Pete Churchill

Jamil Sheriff

Nikki Iles

Services to Jazz Award

Henry Lowther

John Fordham

Dame Cleo Laine

APPJAG currently has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament.  The Group’s officers as at the 24th July 2019 are Co-Chairs, Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, Secretary, Baroness Coussins, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Sarah Champion MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Crathorne, John Mann MP and Sir Greg Knight MP. The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins.

-Ends-

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins

Tel: 0208 840 4643

Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

 Notes to editors

The categories for the 2019 Awards reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene and include:

  • Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2018 by a UK band or musicians)
    •    Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Ensemble of the Year (UK-based group who impressed in 2018)
    •    Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters)
    •    Jazz Media Award (including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books)
    •    Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK)
    •    Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2018)
    •    Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK).The awards have been running since 2005. APPJAG has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords, across all political parties. Its aim is to encourage a wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the industry and issues surrounding it, as well as promoting jazz as a musical form, and to raise its profile both inside and outside of Parliament. Further details are available at: https://appjag.wordpress.com/

 

Parliamentary Jazz Awards 2019

Press Release

Voting is now open for the 2019 Parliamentary Jazz Awards, which will take place at PizzaExpress Live, Holborn, London on Tuesday 3rd December 2019. Entries are open to anyone with the final deadline for entries set for midnight on Friday 31st May 2019. Voting is now closed.

To vote please go to: https://www.pizzaexpresslive.com/parliamentary-jazz-awards

Please note the criteria for the different categories:

Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2018 by a UK band or musicians)

Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK).

Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2018)

Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK)

Jazz Media Award (including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books)

Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters)

Jazz Ensemble of the Year (UK-based group who impressed in 2018)

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2018)

Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2018)

The awards are organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG), co- chaired by Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, and supported by PizzaExpress Live

Notes to the Editor

The All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) currently has over 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament. The Group’s officers as at the 16th July 2018 are Co-Chairs, Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, Secretary, Baroness Coussins, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Sarah Champion MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Crathorne, John Mann MP and Sir Greg Knight MP. The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins. The contact address is: appjag1@gmail.com The web address is: https://appjag.wordpress.

With the support of  and the help of 

Recipients announced for the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

Recipients announced for the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards

The recipients of the 2018 Parliamentary Jazz Awards were announced last night on Tuesday 16th May. The Awards, organised by the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group (APPJAG) with the support of PizzaExpress Live.

Featuring a broad array of jazz talent from within the industry, the awards are sponsored by PizzaExpress Live. During the ceremony, award presenters comprised of British politicians and home-grown UK jazz talent including Co-Chairs of the All Party Parliamentary Jazz Appreciation Group, Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn; Elaine Delmar, Jon Newey, Editor in Chief of Jazzwise, Deirdre Cartwright, Sarah Champion MP, Chi Onwurah MP, Ian Shaw, John Fordham, Baroness Coussins and Saad Gantar (Regional Operations Director Pizza Express).

Compére for the evening was Ross Dines of PizzaExpress Live, “This has been a really strong year for the Parliamentary Jazz Awards in terms of talent and nominations. The well deserved recipients are a veritable who’s who of names that have made a real impact on the music and helped make the UK one of the world’s leading jazz territories”.  A big hand to the Parliamentary Band on the evening; Max Brittain, Alison Rayner, Henry Lowther, Fraser Smith and Sophie Alloway.

The full list of recipients is as follows:

Jazz Vocalist of the Year: Ian Shaw

Ian Shaw is one of the most distinctive, original and creative jazz singers that the UK has produced. His recorded output, now numbering 15 albums to his own name, includes three US releases; his most recent album, “Shine Sister Shine” (Jazz Village) has received universal praise, building on the success of “The Theory Of Joy”, also on Jazz Village.

Alongside solo shows and performances with his regular piano trio, Shaw is also much in demand as the featured soloist with big bands and orchestras both in the UK and internationally. He is also a talented pianist, song writer, presenter and record producer.

“The work of an impassioned and versatile artist…” (Guardian on “Shine Sister Shine”)

 “A brilliant vocal chameleon . . . there’s actually more heart in Ian Shaw’s cleverness than in many singers who wear their hearts conspicuously on their sleeves” (The Telegraph on “The Theory Of Joy”)

Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year: Arun Ghosh

 Arun Ghosh is a clarinetist, composer and music educator.

Described by Ravi Shankar as a ‘natural born improviser’, he is a renowned innovator of the modern Indo Jazz style. A passionate, dynamic and eloquent performer, Arun’s playing combines South Asian raags (scales) and taals (rhythms), with the musical inspirations of his British-Asian and northern upbringing; jazz, rock, classical, folk, hip-hop and dance cultures. Based in London and Manchester, Arun has released four albums on Camoci Records; his latest, the autobiographical “but where are you really from?” was released in October 2017, accompanied by an extensive national tour in 2017/18.

Jazz Album of the Year: Denys Baptiste – “The Late Trane”

 The Late Trane is the powerful and commanding new album from British saxophonist Denys Baptiste, a giant of the UK jazz scene. Reimagining and reworking ten carefully chosen composition from John Coltrane’s late music (from 1963 – 1967) with a fresh and modern new interpretation, The Late Trane perfectly balances Denys Baptiste’s unique artistic vision with the visceral emotions and cosmic references that encompasses Coltrane’s late music.

“With Late Trane, Denys Baptiste has achieved something special and important. He has opened another rare window onto one of the greatest moments in jazz history. He’s made a beautiful and welcoming record that I’m sure will guide others towards those late 60s Impulse masterworks.

Denys has once again taken his time. But it’s been worth the wait”. Jez Nelson

Jazz Ensemble of the Year: ARQ – Alison Rayner Quintet

Alison Rayner formed ARQ after 35 years as a professional bass player, to develop her compositions and create a group sound.

She recorded her first album in 2013 when she was 60; ARQ is now acclaimed on the UK jazz scene following major touring for five years and fantastic reviews for their two albums. They toured Germany this autumn and release their third album next year.

It is still unusual in instrumental jazz groups to see a balance of men and women playing together; women can still be side-lined and older women, in particular, are often marginalised. Great to see a refreshing change with ARQ.

Alison Rayner has just been nominated in Best Double Bass Player category of the British Jazz Awards 2018.

ARQ is: Alison Rayner double bass, Buster Birch drums and percussion, Deirdre Cartwright guitar, Diane McLoughlin saxophones, Steve Lodder piano

 Purposeful, full-toned and melodic… a beautifully integrated band ****

Dave Gelly, The Observer

 Inspired by real-world ideas, people and situations but infused with the kind of heady imagination that transforms their resonances into a series of vivacious musical adventures.  *****

Roger Thomas, BBC Music Magazine

Jazz Newcomer of the Year: Shirley Tetteh

 Having discovered jazz with the help Tomorrow’s Warriors, Shirley Tetteh has continued to explore its rich heritage and tradition, citing influences as diverse as contemporary guitarists Gilad Hekselman and Julian Lage right through to jazz guitar pioneers Charlie Christian and Wes Montgomery. Shirley has performed with the likes of alto saxophonists Nathaniel Facey and Jason Yarde, clarinetist Arun Ghosh, vibraphonist Lewis Wright, and toured with Courtney Pine as part of the fourth Jazz Directors series earlier this year. She is a member of the Jazz FM nominated septet Nerija, Brownswood affiliated Maisha and Casssie Kinoshi’s SEED ensemble, and currently holds the guitar chair in Jazz Jamaica. A rising star in the UK jazz scene, Shirley is one to watch!’’

 Jazz Venue of the Year: Jazz At The Lescar in Sheffield

 Every week since January 2013, over 50 nights a year, Jazz At The Lescar have brought together musicians and audiences in a welcoming, friendly, and listening environment that allows artists to express themselves freely, and provides the opportunity for audiences to experience something out of the ordinary in the backroom of a pub in Sheffield, and occasionally at other ‘pop-up’ venues.

They are a small group of volunteers, mostly musicians from the Sheffield Jazz scene, focused on providing a platform for the very best musicians from around the North, the UK, and further afield. Our programming covers the full spectrum of music encompassed by jazz and improvised music, from the mainstream to the experimental, and its many varied intersections with other musical forms; always with an eye on quality.

They are non-profit, and all money taken at the box, apart from a small contribution to cover marketing, goes to the musicians. The core team are Jez Matthews, Hannah Brady, Rich Keates, and Helen Matthews, supported by an amazing bunch of people (including students from Sheffield University) who provide assistance on the nights, help with publicity, run the website, give us advice, and sell tickets. They couldn’t do it without the creative freedom offered by the team at the Lescar itself to promote the full wide range of music every week, and of course it wouldn’t happen at all without the incredible musicians and audiences who all bring their warmth, vibe and energy to make the magic happen, not least the pin-drop silence that happens for a bass solo or the whisper of a cymbal.

Jazz Media Award: Lance Liddle – Bebop Spoken Here

Lance Liddle is a retired saxophonist based in Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Lance played along played alongside Sting in the Newcastle Big Band in the 1970s

Lance Liddle has been a jazz fan and student of the music since he was 15 years of age attending concerts, festivals, and clubs and, of course, buying and, later, reviewing CDs on Bebop Spoken Here.

Lance Liddle started Bebop Spoken in 2008 with the sole purpose of “Updating the world about jazz in the northeast and updating the northeast about jazz in the world”; all done in a light-hearted manner and the Bebop Spoken Here is updated daily.

The Bebop Spoken Here team covers all genres and reviews most northeast gigs. The blog has 3.5 million page views and is ranked at number 3 in UK and number 26 in the world.

www.lance-bebopspokenhere.blogspot.com

Jazz Education Award: Jean Toussaint

Born in the Caribbean, Toussaint grew up in St Thomas, the St Thomas of Rollins, and started playing sax in high school. After high school Toussaint attended the prestigious Berklee College of music in Boston USA.

While at Berklee, Toussaint was mentored by the great saxophonist/educator Billy Pierce. It was Pierce who recommended Toussaint to replace him in Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers in 1982. He stayed with the Messages for four and a half years, receiving international exposure.

Toussaint finally settled in London UK in the late eighties and has been a positive presence on the rich UK/European jazz scene since. He splits his time with live performances at festivals, clubs, concert halls everywhere and teaching and mentoring up and coming musicians in an effort to help keep jazz music alive.

His newly released 11th CD JT Allstar 6tet “Brother Raymond “is available and received glowing reviews in all the Jazz press. Toussaint and band will be on an extensive UK tour between September and December 2018

Services to Jazz Award: Jill Rodger

 Jill joined Glasgow International Jazz Festival as Administrator at the beginning of 1990 – in the lead up to the Festival’s part in “Glasgow – European City of Culture”.

After 5 years in administration at a Scotch Whisky distillers this was a “baptism of fire” into the world of music events – and jazz in particular – Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, BB King, Maynard Ferguson and many, many more.

With promotion to General Manager in 1998 and then Festival Director in 2005 she has been at the helm of Glasgow’s longest running music festival for almost 15 years.

 Special APPJAG Award: Gary Crosby OBE

Born in London of Jamaican parents, and the nephew of Jamaican jazz guitarist, Ernest Ranglin, Gary Crosby OBE is a towering figure in jazz who has been consistently at the forefront of the British jazz scene throughout a career that so far spans 40 years. In 1991 he co-founded Tomorrow’s Warriors with his partner, Janine Irons MBE to provide a platform for the nurture and development of aspiring young jazz talent, with a particular focus on musicians from the African diaspora and girls. Crosby’s exemplary efforts have been acknowledged with numerous awards, including an OBE for Services to Music in 2009.

Kelvin Hopkins MP, APPJAG Co-Chairman, said: “The Parliamentary Jazz Awards are a great way for MPs and Peers of all political parties to show their support for British jazz by recognising and honouring the amazing musical talent we have in our country. From established stars to fresh new talent, the range and diversity of this year’s winners shows the vibrancy and creativity of British jazz. We are extremely grateful once again to PizzaEpress Live for supporting the Awards.”

 APPJAG currently has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords across all political parties. Their aim is to encourage wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the jazz industry and issues surrounding it, to promote jazz as a musical form and to raise its profile inside and outside Parliament.  The Group’s officers as at the 16th July 2018 are Co-Chairs, Kelvin Hopkins MP and Lord Colwyn, Secretary, Baroness Coussins, Vice Chairs, Alison Thewless MP and Sarah Champion MP, the Treasurer is Ian Paisley MP. Officers are: Lord Crathorne, John Mann MP and Sir Greg Knight MP. The Secretariat is Chris Hodgkins.

Ends

For further information please contact:

Chris Hodgkins

Tel: 0208 840 4643

Email: chris.hodgkins3@googlemail.com

 Notes to editors

The categories for the 2018 Awards reflect the ever-increasing scope of talent from within the UK’s jazz scene and include:

  • Jazz Album of the Year (released in 2017 by a UK band or musicians)
    •    Jazz Vocalist of the Year (UK-based vocalist who impressed in 2017)
    •    Jazz Instrumentalist of the Year (UK-based musician who impressed in 2017)
    •    Jazz Ensemble of the Year (UK-based group who impressed in 2017)
    •    Jazz Venue of the Year (including jazz clubs, venues, festivals and promoters)
    •    Jazz Media Award (including broadcasters, journalists, magazines, blogs, listings and books)
    •    Jazz Education Award (to an educator or project for raising the standard of jazz education in the UK)
    •    Jazz Newcomer of the Year (UK-based artist, musician or group with a debut album released in 2017)
    •    Services to Jazz Award (to a living person for their outstanding contribution to jazz in the UK).The awards have been running since 2005. APPJAG has 80 members from the House of Commons and House of Lords, across all political parties. Its aim is to encourage a wider and deeper enjoyment of jazz, to increase Parliamentarians’ understanding of the industry and issues surrounding it, as well as promoting jazz as a musical form, and to raise its profile both inside and outside of Parliament.